Category Archives: Marijuana legal

How to Avoid a Marijuana Arrest in a Car in Minnesota: Top Nine Tips

The other day I was talking to a prosecutor.  I let him know that my objective was to keep my client’s public record clean of words like “marijuana,” “drug paraphernalia,” and “criminal conviction.”  He responded mischievously with “You know how he could avoid all that don’t you?  Don’t get caught.”  He was joking, but like many jokes there was some truth in it.

As of this writing, eight states in the U.S.A. have legalized marijuana for responsible use by adults 21 years and older; and, the majority of the U.S. population now lives in a state with legal medical marijuana.  We should all know by now that marijuana is safer than alcohol.  There is no lethal overdose possible with marijuana, unlike alcohol, aspirin, and many prescription drugs.   But in Minnesota in 2017 despite a majority in the polls favoring legalization, criminal Prohibition lingers on, destroying innocent lives.

What can you do to reduce the chance of getting caught? Here are nine tips:

  1.   Situational awareness.  Guess where the vast majority of police contacts with people happen?  Correct – in or near a motor vehicle.  As a result, the most effective way to avoid a marijuana criminal charge is to avoid having marijuana in your vehicle.  Complacency can set in.  If it hasn’t happened yet, it never will.  Right?  The smart attitude is that if a scenario is unlikely, with repetition (miles traveled in the car), it will inevitably happen.  There will be a traffic stop.  When it does happen; marijuana should not be in the car.  If the prudent marijuana smoker does carry marijuana in the car only when absolutely necessary, he or she keeps it under the “small amount” 42.5 grams if plant form (not concentrates), but always in the trunk of the car (to avoid a “marijuana in a motor vehicle” charge).
  2.   Odor.  The most common excuse used by police officers as probable cause to search a car after a traffic stop is “odor of marijuana” – either fresh or burned.  This is prone to abuse by police officers since it’s impossible to verify.  Even so, to prevent getting caught with marijuana in your car avoid having the odor of marijuana either on your person or in your car.  And, if you do have the odor of marijuana on your person or in your car, be sure not to have any actual marijuana in your car.  Have you or anyone you know experienced “nose blindness?”  A person who has smoked a cigarette may not be able to smell the odor of past cigarette use on another person.  The same for a person who has been drinking an alcoholic beverage – can’t smell the odor of alcohol on another person.  But non-users can smell it.  It’s best to assume that if you’ve been smoking it that day, there may be odor.  If it’s been smoked in the car, the odor is probably lingering in the car for a day or more.  (Tip: don’t ever smoke in the car.)

    “I’m late, for a very important date.”

  3.   Consent?  “No, officer, I do not consent to a search.” Like Paul Simon’s song “50 ways to leave your lover,” there are at least fifty ways to tell a police officer that you do not consent to any searches.  Make an excuse if you like: “I’m late, for a very important date.”  But no excuse is necessary.  You should not offer any justification for refusing a search.  Be confident and politely insistent. It’s your legal right to be secure from searches and seizures by police unless they have a search warrant or an exception to the warrant requirement.  One of those exceptions is a consent search.  Police often ask people “do you mind if I search”?  The correct answer is, “I do not want to be searched.”   If you do consent to a search, you’ve waived your right to object later to the otherwise unlawful nature of the search.  Also, if police know they have no legal basis to search without “consent,” then they may leave without searching.
  4.   You can do both: don’t lie and don’t admit. How?    Remain silent.  Or if words come out of your mouth make sure that they are not lies, and do not relate to illegality.  More than half the people stopped by police in traffic, when questioned about “marijuana in the car?” after the police officer claims “odor” will either lie or admit having marijuana in the car, often then telling the police where it is.  Wrong!  Instead, remain silent – meaning words are not produced by you.  Tightening your lips may help your resolve.  If you do say something, change the subject and avoid talking about whether there is marijuana in the car or not.  And again, do not consent to a search.  Police will try to make you think: “Busted.  The jig is up. May as well come clean now.  Give up.  You cannot win at this point.”  But don’t believe it for a minute!  You need to be prepared.  Knowing the law can help keep your confidence level up, and help you avoid or minimize legal trouble.
  5.   Unlawfully prolonged detention: “Am I free to leave?”  Here is the scenario.  You’re stopped by police for a headlight out, or speeding.  Normally it takes five or ten minutes for a police officer to complete the process, hand you the ticket, encourage you to pay it without taking it to court, and walk away.  You understand that to mean that the government intrusion upon your liberty is now over and you are “free to leave.”  Now, let’s change the scenario.  You’ve been stopped for something normally resolved with a traffic ticket within five minutes, but this time the officer is prolonging the detention.Is that legal?  Suffice it to say that the courts will apply a balancing test under the “totality of the circumstances” to determine whether they think the greater intrusion upon your Liberty interest was balanced by a greater level of reasonable suspicion of criminal activity.  But one of the factors courts will consider is: “to what extent did the person acquiesce to the detention vs. assert and communicate a desire to end it and leave?”  A common game played by police in court is to claim that “at that point, the person was free to leave and the prolonged time was consensual.”  If believed, then the prolonged detention might need less justification, fewer facts supporting a reasonable suspicion of criminal activity.Since “Fleeing a police officer” is a crime in Minnesota – whether in a motor vehicle or on foot – whether a person is begin “detained” by police or not, ought to be a simple black and white question.  Either you are “free to leave” or not.  The best way to make a record of that is to ask: “Officer am I free to go now?”  And don’t just do it once.  Do it more than once.  Say it loud and clear, for the camera and microphones.  This will help your lawyer challenge the legality of the search and arrest later, should it come to that.  At times it can be a good idea to just start slowly walking away, to force the police officer to tell you to stop.  (Yes, you can walk away from a car stop even if you’re not the passenger.)
  6.   “You have the right to remain silent.” When you hear that, that is your cue to – what?    It’s your cue to stop forming words and allowing them to escape your mouth!  If you want to say anything, you can say:  “Officer, I realize you are doing your job but I am not a lawyer or a police officer.  I need to assert my legal right to remain silent, and to consult legal counsel before answering questions or talking about this situation at all.”  Repeat as necessary.  No matter what they do or say, they cannot require you to speak.  So don’t.  If police direct you to show your hands, lie down, hands behind your back, stand over there, and the like, follow their commands.  But do not speak.
  7.   Field Exercises. Sometimes police may want to build a case for impaired driving.  When they do, they will ask you to perform what they optimistically term “Field Sobriety Tests.”  These are not scientifically valid and are designed to incriminate.  Even completely sober people have a difficult time “passing” them.  What to do?  Don’t!  Police cannot legally require anyone to do these field exercises, such as the “Nine-step walk and turn,” “Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus” eye test.  You can and should refuse to do any of these.  When you do, the police officer may invite an excuse.  But don’t take that bait.  Any excuse could be incriminating, even if falsely.  Instead you can say: “Officer, I am aware of my legal rights and I respectfully choose not to do any field exercises or tests.”  You may get asked repeatedly.  If so, just keep repeating that you choose not to do them – no excuses.  (Who cares if you have one leg! That’s beside the point.)  It’s your legal right.  (Note that if the police officer has factual reason to suspect impaired driving and requests that you blow into a Preliminary Breath Test (PBT) machine and you refuse to blow, you can be arrested in Minnesota for that refusal.)
  8.   Smile, you’re being recorded. From the beginning of a traffic stop, to sitting in a squad car, to the police station or jail, it’s best to assume that you and all you say are being recorded.  This recording may later hurt you, or help you.  Even when alone or with another person in the back of a police car, this is normally recorded – even when no police officer is in the car.  Phone calls from jail are almost always recorded for potential later use as evidence.  Be aware of this.  Avoid talking about the case in any of these contexts.
  9.   Keep your cool if arrested. Hitting the panic button will only make it worse.  Police may try to exploit your trauma and emotional upset.  Remain calm.  The long game can be won, by playing defense in the short game.  You or someone on the outside can help you contact a Minnesota criminal defense lawyer and if need be a bail bond agent.  Most people will be able to get out with a few days or less.

Thomas C. Gallagher is a Minneapolis marijuana lawyer frequently representing people charged with possession of marijuana and related “crimes” in Minnesota.

Comments and responses below.

Thomas C. Gallagher Elected Chair of Minnesota NORML Board of Directors – Marijuana Legalization in Minnesota

On September 16, 2017 the Board of Directors of Minnesota NORML elected Thomas C. Gallagher to the position of Chair of the Board.  Gallagher is a Minneapolis Criminal Lawyer who twice campaigned for election as a Representative in the Minnesota House in District 61B (incumbent Paul Thissen) in 2014 and 2016.  He was the endorsed candidate of Republican Party of Minnesota in both election cycles.

“Minnesota NORML is a non-partisan Minnesota Nonprofit with 501(c)(4) status,” Gallagher noted.  “Our goal is legal marijuana in Minnesota for responsible adult use.  Minnesotans should have equal rights to cannabis as to beer and wine.  This means age 21 and older, taxed and regulated the same as beer and wine, and legal small batch home production.”

Thomas C. Gallagher, Chair, Minnesota NORML

“Home grow” Gallagher said, “is essential.  Ending marijuana prohibition is only incidentally about marijuana; it is really about personal freedom.  We want to empower the People, support Liberty for all.  With legal home grow, anyone can grow their own cannabis for medicinal or personal use with little money.  Freedom should not be limited to people with money.”

“Now that all major polling shows majority support for legalization of marijuana (and a super-majority for medical marijuana), why – in a democracy – is the will of the People not yet enacted into law?” Gallagher asks.

If our elected officials lack the political courage to enact the will of the People, then we say “Let the People Decide!”  Bills in the Minnesota legislature would place a constitutional amendment on the general election ballot to, finally, legalize marijuana for responsible adult use like beer and wine.  Even politicians unwilling to support legalization should be able to support democracy, the vote and “allowing” the People to decide.  We support these Bills.

“It’s not inevitable.  There are vested interests who now profit from the current Prohibition regime fighting hard to reverse the progress we’ve made, and to stop the return of Freedom to the People of Minnesota,” Gallagher warned.  “’How soon will it be legal?’ people ask me.  ‘How soon will you join us working hard to make it happen?’ is my smiling reply” says Gallagher.

Minnesota NORML holds monthly Members Meetings and other events and activities to help people connect and get involved.  For further information:
http://mnnorml.org
https://www.facebook.com/mnNORML

#LetThePeopleDecide

Less Than One-Quarter Gram Possession Gross Misdemeanor Crime < New Minnesota Laws 2016

The 2016 Minnesota Legislature made some changes to Minnesota “Controlled Substance” crime laws, effective August 1, 2016.  One of those created a new Gross Misdemeanor level crime for certain “controlled substance” possession crimes, for less than 0.25 grams or one dosage unit or less – but only for a person “who has not been previously convicted of a violation of this chapter or a similar offense in another jurisdiction; and only for possession of “controlled substances” other than heroin.  This is an improvement since before this new law, even these tiny amounts were charged as felony level crimes; and since a felony conviction can render a person unemployable in many jobs, lifetime loss of civil rights, severe immigration law consequences, and other big problems.

The statutory language is:

Minn. Stat. §152.025, Subd. 4 (a)(1) “the amount of the controlled substance possessed, other than heroin, is less than 0.25 grams or one dosage unit or less if the controlled substance was possessed in dosage units …”

hash-quarter-gram-lighter

one-quarter gram of hash relative to the size of a lighter

Does this mean defense lawyer will no longer need to litigate trace amount issues and cases?  No.  A Gross Misdemeanor is still a serious crime.  Also, this new law does not apply to heroin or federal cases.

What about marijuana, including derivatives such as hashish, wax, dabs?  Minnesota law still defines possession of a “small amount” of plant-form marijuana as a petty misdemeanor (not a crime, violation-fine only).  Minnesota Statutes §152.01, Subd. 16 defines Small amount: “‘Small amount’ as applied to marijuana means 42.5 grams or less. This provision shall not apply to the resinous form of marijuana.”  So, 0.24 grams or less of plant-form marijuana could be charged a petty misdemeanor violation, not a gross misdemeanor.  When it comes to the “resinous form of marijuana” (presumably hashish, wax, dabs, etc.), however, the “small amount” definition would not apply but the new trace amount Gross Misdemeanor possession law would apply – rather than a felony crime as before August 1, 2016.

What drugs could be charged as a quantity expressed in dosage units, rather than weight?  These could be divided into two categories: prescription drugs and underground economy drugs.  Most prescription drugs are made into and possessed in pill form.  A “dosage unit” could be one pill, or could be more than one pill, depending upon the recommendation of the drug maker, pharmacist, or prescribing physician.  For underground economy drugs, “one dosage unit” could be more than one pill, or more than one square of blotter paper with LSD on it.  For example, see State v. Palmer, 507 NW 2d 865 (Minn.App. 1993) (“four small squares on each sheet constituted a ‘hit’ or dosage unit.”).  Medical marijuana produced by a legal maker may be the same as prescription drugs, in terms of evidence of dosage units.

What about Minnesota Pretrial Diversion programs and statutory Stays of Adjudication under Minnesota Statutes §152.18?  They are still available for those charged with Minnesota Fifth Degree “Controlled Substance” Crime Fifth Degree, Gross Misdemeanor, since the Gross Misdemeanor charge is a Fifth Degree charge against a person without prior drug convictions.

Thomas Gallagher is a Minneapolis Drug Defense Lawyer.  He is also a member of the Board of Directors of Minnesota NORML.

The Necessity Defense for Medical Marijuana Patients – 2015 Minnesota Proposed Legislation HF 542 – SF 404 Redux

The problem:  In Minnesota today, a medical marijuana patient charged with a marijuana crime is no longer allowed by the courts to tell the jury they were treating illness with marijuana.

shhhhThe solution:  A Bill in the 2015 Legislature would legislatively overrule the court decision that took away “the necessity defense” from medical marijuana patients facing marijuana charges.

Marijuana has been used as effective medicine for thousands of years.  In the 1930s, Minnesota joined a social experiment of Prohibition outlawing the plant – even for medical use. Today though, a majority in the U.S.A. believe that medical marijuana should not be a crime.

Trial by jury limits the power of the government to enforce laws in ways that violate the conscience of the community.  Yet when a chronic pain patient using marijuana as medicine is charged with a marijuana crime, but is not permitted to have their physician testify, or to testify about it themselves; there is no meaningful jury trial.  When the court prevents the jury from hearing defense evidence, excluding the defense, her right to present a defense is violated.

“Necessity” has been a recognized legal defense to what otherwise would be a crime, since ancient times. The New Testament cites examples of eating holy bread through necessity of hunger or taking another’s corn. Mathew 12:3-4. Old English cases recognize the defense of necessity. It was a defense to breaking a law that the accused committed the act to save a life or put out a fire. A person did not commit the misdemeanor of exposing an infected person in public if the person was being carried through the streets to a doctor.

  1. Like self-defense, the necessity defense is an affirmative defense to a criminal charge – a “lesser-of-two-evils” defense. After the accused presents evidence supporting the defense, the judge instructs the jury on the law of the defense of necessity.  If the jury accepts the defense: the defendant did the prohibited act intentionally, but did so reasonably to avoid a greater evil, out of necessity; so it is not a crime.
  2. The necessity defense was repealed by a 1991 Minnesota court decision, in State v. Hanson, 468 NW 2d 77 (Minn Court of Appeals 1991). FFI: http://wp.me/pAFjr-5U
  3. The Minnesota Legislature can restore the rights to a jury trial and to present a defense by passing HF 542 & SF 404. The Bill restores the necessity defense to medical marijuana patients charged with a marijuana crime.  Jurors have the right to know the relevant facts before judging a person’s fate.
  4. People like Angela Brown, and her 15 year-old son, should be allowed to present a necessity defense at her trial, so the jury can then have the power to decide her case based upon the true facts, not some version of the truth manipulated by the court.

Urge your Minnesota Rep. and State Senator to support the necessity defense Bill,  HF 542SF 404, to assure medical patients have the “right to introduce evidence or testimony of a medical need to use, … or [evidence of] a benefit derived from the use” of marijuana or derivatives.

Medical Marijuana: Minnesota Government Stalls Inclusion of Intractable Pain

According to a recent Associated Press article No quick decision on medical marijuana for pain Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton’s Commissioner of Health has decided to postpone adding Intractable Pain to Minnesota’s new,  legal medical marijuana program.  Apparently, Dayton administration officials are setting expectations at the delay being potentially for years.  The reason they cite is their fear that they may not be ready for an increased volume of demand should intractable pain be included in the list of medical problems that qualify for medical marijuana in the Minnesota program.

Arthritis_poster-sm-cr Marijuana has proven an effective treatment for intractable pain — and better than more commonly used narcotic medications.  Marijuana provides pain relief and relief from pain-related disability.  And it does not kill people or have the other side effects that toxic opioid pain medications have.

With 23 states now having legal medical marijuana — Minnesota being a laggard in this respect — one might wonder: how have other states managed to come up with an adequate, legal supply of marijuana to meet the legitimate demand of the sick and suffering for legal, medical marijuana?  One obvious answer could be that only one other of those 23 states has failed to allow the natural, plant-form of marijuana for lawful, medical use.  Minnesota could remove that restriction from its law, and so remove steps that would save time, reduce cost, and help more suffering people sooner.

Other possibilities come to mind to more quickly ramp up production of legal marijuana in Minnesota; including authorizing more than two producers, and authorizing legal home grow for qualified medical marijuana patients.  These would also reduce the expected high cost of medicine in Minnesota’s medical marijuana program.

Minnesota’s governor was not an enthusiastic supporter of the medical marijuana law that eventually passed last year, but did sign on to a compromise law that is one of the two weakest in the United States today.  This news of delay in including intractable pain, could be interpreted by some as more evidence of tepid support for medical marijuana from the Minnesota Governor.

What can be done?  The Minnesota legislature could pass additional legislation to strengthen and expand Minnesota’s medical marijuana program.  It could also pass the medical necessity defense Bill, to restore fairness for patients facing criminal charges for marijuana. The bill, HF 542 in the Minnesota House and SF 404 in the Minnesota Senate, would give medical marijuana patients the “right to introduce evidence or testimony of a medical need to use, … or [evidence of] a benefit derived from the use” of marijuana or marijuana products.

Marijuana Medical Necessity: Why Minnesota Needs a New Law Affirming Your Right to Present a Medical Necessity Defense to a Marijuana Charge

Minnesota needs to adopt a new statute affirming your right to present the defense of medical necessity to a marijuana criminal-charge.  Why?

Marijuana, or cannabis, has been used by humans as medicine for thousands of years successfully for relief and treatment of disease.  Modern medical research, as well as clinical practice, has proven its efficacy in relieving symptoms as well as curing diseases — from the bothersome all the way to cancer.

Marijuana had never been a crime.  But beginning in the 1930s in the United States, as the alcohol Prohibition regime was disintegrating, a new experiment in Prohibition was being developed to replace it — the marijuana Prohibition.  Marijuana was widely used as medicine at the time, and its medicinal use persisted for decades but was eventually driven underground after increased criminalization policies in the United States, and in Minnesota.  Its use, including medical use, continued but was made criminal.

Necessity has been a recognized legal defense to what otherwise would be a crime, since ancient times.  In The Defense of Necessity in Criminal Law: The Right to Choose the Lesser Evil some of this history is summarized:

The English courts stated the principle of necessity in 1551 in Reninger v. Fagossa (1 Plowd. 1, 75 Eng. Rep. 1): “A man may break the words of the law, and yet not break the law itself … where the words of them are broken to avoid greater inconvenience, or through necessity, or by compulsion.” The case cites the New Testament example of eating sacred bread through necessity of hunger or taking another’s corn. Mathew 12:3-4. Older English cases contain many examples which recognize the general principle of necessity. It was a defense to breaking a law that the person committed the act to save a life or put out a fire. Jurors could depart without the permission of the judge in case of emergency. Prisoners might escape from a burning jail without committing a crime. A person did not commit the misdemeanor of exposing an infected person in public if the person was being carried through the streets to a doctor.

The necessity defense is sometimes called the lesser-of-two-evils defense.  It is a justification type defense.  If the defense is accepted by the jury, it does not mean the defendant did not intentionally do the prohibited act, but rather that he or she reasonably did so to avoid a greater evil, out of necessity.  It is a common law defense — old and widely accepted.  Like many other common law defenses, it has often been codified in statutes over the past several decades, in many jurisdictions.

med-mj-mn-signThe term “medical necessity defense” is a special application of the more general, necessity defense.  If you are sick with glaucoma or cancer and marijuana provides you with relief or cure, even though marijuana may be a crime to possess or grow in some states, you may decide that preserving your health (or your child’s life) is a greater necessity than complying with the criminal Prohibition.  The majority of people in the United States today, according to poll after poll, agree that medical use of marijuana should not be a crime.  As a result it is likely that many if not most jurors may share that majority view, that medical marijuana is not a real crime.  But in Minnesota jurors are not currently empowered to decide cases with all of the evidence.

Since you are constitutionally guaranteed the right to a jury trial, and the right to present a complete defense — to present the jury with your true defense, for the jury to do with it as it will —  how could it be that the Minnesota appellate courts have so far held that you have no right to present a medical necessity defense in a marijuana case?

To find out, you can read the Minnesota Court of Appeals case from 1991, State v. Hanson.  Though every court case is fact specific to a great extent, the court’s main rationales in the State v. Hanson case are captured in this excerpt:

“The statutory classification of marijuana as a Schedule I substance implies a determination that marijuana has “no currently accepted medical use in the United States.” Minn.Stat. § 152.02, subd. 7(1) (1990). The legislature has enacted a single exception, in the THC Therapeutic Research Act (TRA), exempting from criminal sanctions possession or use of marijuana for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy who are receiving the drug under the strict controls of an approved medical research program. Minn. Stat. § 152.21, subds. 1, 3, 6 (1990). These statutory provisions demonstrate that the legislature has specifically addressed and determined the possible medical uses of marijuana.”

The first point, that marijuana has been classified by Minnesota as “a Schedule I substance” meaning they claim that it has “no currently accepted medical use in the United States,” if it has ever been true, is certainly not true today.  Though marijuana is still arbitrarily classified by Minnesota as “Schedule I,” the majority of the United States population now lives in states with legal medical marijuana programs, and marijuana is now currently accepted as having medical use — including by the United States Surgeon General.

The second argument advanced in Hanson, was that since the Minnesota legislature had enacted THC Therapeutic Research Act (which created a “research” program so restrictive that nothing ever came of it); that therefore the legislature must have intended to preclude any other consideration of any other exception or defense for medical use of marijuana (though it never said so).  Not particularly persuasive here, the argument is of the classic rhetorical form — expressio unius est exclusio alterius, a Latin phase meaning “the expression of one thing is the exclusion of the other.”

The Hanson case was from 1991.  Much has changed since then, politically, legally, and in the medical research community, has it not?  So would a modern Minnesota appellate court right this 1991 wrong?  In 2014, it didn’t. In a 2014 decision the Minnesota Supreme Court, in State v. Thiel left intact the Schedule I classification despite a constitutional challenge by a defendant convicted of marijuana possession who had not been allowed to let the jury know the truth about his medical  condition, his medical recommendation for marijuana as medicine, or his California medical marijuana card.

It seems reasonable to conclude then, that the Minnesota courts are unlikely to remedy this injustice and restore our right to a fair jury trial, and our right to present a complete defense in Minnesota — at least not in the near term.

That is why we need the Minnesota legislature to restore some measure of Liberty and Justice in Minnesota, by passing a Bill for a new statute guaranteeing your right to let the jury hear the truth, that medical marijuana is a lesser evil (if it is an evil at all) than violating the criminal law prohibiting marijuana.

The Bill currently in the Minnesota legislature would restore the necessity defense to medical marijuana patients charged with a marijuana crime in Minnesota.  It would guarantee that the accused could use this as an affirmative defense — meaning the defendant would have the burden of showing prima facie evidence of medical necessity, and if successful, the ultimate burden of proving criminal guilt would then shift to the prosecution.  This would help restore the right to a jury trial to an extent as well.  The jurors have the right to hear the truth before condemning a person.

Contact your Minnesota House of Representatives member, your Minnesota State Senator, and the Governor to urge support of the medical necessity Bill, HF 542.

Conflicting Medical Marijuana Bills in Minnesota: Senate version is Good, House version is Bad

This week, the MN Senate passed a medical marijuana Bill that is better than nothing. Friday May 9, 2014,The MN House passed a Bill that is worse than nothing. The two Bills will now go to a Sentate-House Conference Committee to negotiate one Bill that will then face an up or down vote in the House and Senate, and if passed in both, then go to the Governor.

Image

We need to advocate, now, for the Senate version in MN. We need to urge our respective MN Senators and MN House members, as well the MN Governor, to support the current Senate version, not the current House version

A side-by-side comparison of the two bills for your reference, created by Minnesotans for Compassionate Care is reproduced below.  Please contact your legislators (and the Governor) and make sure they know what you need. Share!

SF 2470 and SF 1641

A Side-By-Side Comparison of Medical Cannabis Bills (as of May 10, 2014):

  SF 2470 The House Delete-All Bill SF 1641 The Senate Bill
Net Cost to Minnesota $4.9 million during the first three fiscal years; in the third year (FY 2017), the net cost is projected at $962,000 Cost neutral; during the first two years, the net cost is projected at $4.5 million, mostly from the Special Revenue fund; beginning in FY17, net savings are projected, with the savings in FY17 being $390,000; Note: even states with lower patients registry fees — such as Michigan — have seen multi-millions annual surpluses, as has Arizona
Sources of Cannabis A single state-approved manufacturer (3.27-3.29) 55 regulated and licensed alternative treatment centers (ATCs) (7.22-7.31)
Access Points A single manufacturer with 2 satellite locations; patients must pick up cannabis from an on-site pharmacist; pharmacists must deliver it to the patients’ homes if they are disabled, and may charge for delivery (9.21-9.23; 10.14-10.20, 13.12) 55 regulated ATCs with one in each county with over 20,000 residents, none in less populous counties, two to three in the most populous two counties, and two in St. Louis County; each patient must designate a single ATC (7.22-7.31)
Permissible Modes of Administration of Cannabis Only liquids, pills, and oils are initially allowed, patients could only vaporize liquids and oils (though extracts are more intoxicating and make dosage control difficult) (1.19-2.4) Smoking is prohibited; other means of administration are allowed (See: 4.16)
Laboratories One laboratory, selected by the manufacturer, is allowed (4.18-4.22) The commissioner will regulate and license safety compliance facilities to perform lab testing and training (3.21-3.27, 6.20-7.21)
Qualifying Conditions Cancer, glaucoma HIV/AIDS, Tourette’s, ALS, seizures, severe and persistent muscle spasms, Crohn’s disease, and other conditions added by the commissioner (2.30-3.4) Cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, Tourette’s; ALS, seizures, severe and persistent muscle spasms, Crohn’s disease; severe, intractable pain; severe nausea; cachexia or wasting; PTSD, hepatitis C, and conditions added by the commissioner (2.12-2.23)
Caregivers Only patients who are so disabled that their practitioner specifies they cannot administer their own medicine may have a caregiver; caregivers cannot pick up their medicine and can only help with the administration of cannabis at the patient’s home; caregivers must be at least 21 and can assist a single patient   (2.20-2.24, 10.19-10.20) Each patients may designate a caregiver to pick up their medicine and help administer cannabis; caregivers must be at least 21 and can’t have certain convictions; caregivers can assist no more than five patients (2.24-2.26)
Cost to Patients for Registry Identification Card and Cannabis Patients would pay $200 per year (or $50 in some cases) for registration and the single manufacturer will determine the cost of cannabis (13.3-13.16) Patients would pay $140 per year (or $26 in some cases) for a state ID card; patients could compare the costs of medical cannabis and decide which ATC to designate (8.15-8.17)
Patient Registry Identification Each patient and caregiver must have a registry identification number; no photo is mentioned (See: 2.17-2.18) Each patient and caregiver must have a registry ID card with a photograph of the cardholder (9.31); the department must set up a phone or web-based verification system for law enforcement and ATC staff (13.6-13.14)
Additional Requirement for Minors None specified, except that the manufacturer will dispense the cannabis to a minor patient’s parent or legal guardian (9.24-9.32) Minors must have two certifications and their parent/guardian must consent and control the acquisition of cannabis, the dosage, and the frequency of is use (9.5-9.18)
Selection of Provider(s) Requirements include that the manufacturer must have experience growing medical cannabis (meaning it must be from out-of-state), have long-term financial stability, and must have “demonstrated an ability to meet the medical cannabis production needs” of the program (4.1-4.17) ATCs are selected using a merit-based numerically scored selection process considering the location, character and experience of applicants, the business plan, the security plan, and the ability to maintain an adequate supply; ATCs must comply with local zoning and be 1,000 feet from schools (5.5-5.13; 7.1, 7.10-7.13)
Anti-Discrimination Provisions Includes limited anti-discrimination protections in housing, employment, child custody, and medical care (such as organ transplants) (12.12-13.2) Includes limited anti-discrimination protections in housing, employment, child custody, and medical care (such as organ transplants) (17.20-18.9)
Limitations Patients could not drive while impaired or undertake anything while impaired that would be negligence or malpractice, they could not possess cannabis at schools or correctional facilities; they could not vaporize cannabis in a public place or where minors would inhale it; patients needing caregivers could only use cannabis at their own home (3.5-3.19, 11.28-11.31) Patients could not drive while impaired or undertake anything while impaired that would be negligence or malpractice, they could not possess cannabis at schools or correctional facilities; they could not vaporize cannabis in a public place or where minors would inhale it (4.8-4.25)
Security Provisions for Manufacturer/ATCs The manufacturer’s application must show it can provide appropriate security measures (4.12) The commissioner will set security requirements, including an alarm system, facility access controls, perimeter intrusion detection systems, personnel identification system, and a 24-hour surveillance system that is accessible to law enforcement and the commissioner (5.16-5.26)
Medical Practitioners’ Role Practitioners certify that the patient has a qualifying condition; throughout the treatment, practitioners must submit the patient’s health records to the commissioner; it is not clear how often and how much data must be sent (8.12-8.14, 8.30-8.35) After a full examination of the patient, in the course of a bona fide patient-practitioner relationship, practitioners would be able to sign a written certification that a patient has a qualifying condition and that the patient is likely to receive therapeutic or palliative benefit from cannabis, allowing the patient to enroll in the program (3.34-4.6)
Available Medical Cannabis Strains The commissioner must decide the chemical composition of the cannabis (1.21, 4.23-4.27) The ATCs can decide what strains to produce based on patients need and may innovate
Medical Cannabis Business Fees The single manufacturer will pay a $20,000 annual fee; $19,000 will be refunded to unsuccessful applicants; labs appear to pay no fee (3.31-3.32) Each of the 55 ATCs will pay a $15,000 annual fee; each lab will pay $5,000 per year; $14,000 and $4,000 are refunded to unsuccessful applicants (6.27-6.30)
Packing Requirements None appear to be specified Must be compliance with the U.S. Poison Prevention Packing Act regarding child resistant packaging and exemptions for packaging for elderly patients (5.27-5.30)
Labeling Requirements Cannabis must be labeled with the patient’s name, registry number, and date of birth; the dosage; and the chemical composition (10.3-10.11) The commissioner will develop labeling rules, including the ratio of THC and CBD in products for oral consumption (5.32-5.34)
Signage and Advertising There is no mention of restrictions of advertising, marketing, or signage The commissioner will develop rules to restrict signage, marketing, and advertising (6.3-6.4)
Penalties There is no mention of the ability to suspend or revoke a manufacturer’s registration or of additional penalties for violating department rules or the medical cannabis law The department will accept complaints and may revoke the registration of ATCs, patients, and caregivers that violate the law (18.16-19.7); in addition to existing penalties, a new felony is created for any diversion of medical cannabis; a petty misdemeanor is created for a patient’s failure to provide certain notifications; new penalties are also created for letting someone else fraudulently use one’s ID card, for fraudulent records or statements, and for violations by ATCs (19.9-20.23)
Advisory Council or Task Force A task force would be established with four legislators, four patients, four health care practitioners, four members of law enforcement, four substance abuse treatment providers, and the commissioners of public safety, health, and human services; the task force would issue an impact assessment of eight things, including program design and implementation, patients’ experiences, access to and quality of cannabis, impact on law enforcement, and the impact on incidence of substance abuse; the task force would issue a biennial report (15.6-16.21) An advisory council of four health care practitioners; one patient; public safety, human services, and health designees; and one chemist or scientist will make recommendations on implementation and on adding qualifying conditions, and will assess whether ATCs are meeting patients’ needs (21.12-22.9); in addition, the health commissioner, consulting with the advisory council, will make a biennial assessment on the same factors as are in SF 2470’s task force, along with information on others states’ experience, medical literature, and a method to track practitioners who certify patients and their conditions (22.11-23.2)
Permissible Amount of Cannabis The commissioner must set ranges of doses and the manufacturer must determine the patient’s dosage; patents may have no more than a 30-day supply (9.34-10.2, 10.12-10.13) 2.5 ounces at a time (1.17)
Timeline for Access The single manufacturer must begin distributing cannabis by July 1, 2015 (4.3), but the commissioner is allowed up to three six-month delays in all deadlines, meaning cannabis may not be available until 2017 (5.1-5.3) The commission must begin issuing registry identification cards to patients and registrations to ATCs by July 1, 2015 (20.28-20.29)